Courtesy for Boys and Girls

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Courtesy for Boys and Girls

Wintony Sands:

Thoughts Sharing

Originally posted on One African Storyteller:

Courtesy for Boys and Girls


I recently found this book when Gloria and Maybel were moving out of their apartment: Courtesy for Boys and Girls.

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I remembered reading this book in elementary school. I was in Nigeria at the time so i doubt my school provided us with the text but my Mama had it at home. I would read through to find out what to so and what not to do in my environment.

Growing up, respect for elders, kindness, charity and hygiene among others were an integral part of a child’s behavior growing up. You had to be respectful to elders. Never address an adult by their first name, always use an appropriate prefix. We never used our left hand to collect something from anybody especially elders since it was a sign of disrespect. Don’t sit down when talking to your elders, unless they asked you to. Get…

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Letter to my generation of young Ghanaians. Part I.

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Letter to my generation of young Ghanaians. Part I.

Wintony Sands:

making a mental note…

Originally posted on The Kente Weaver:

When I started writing this, I had many questions of where to start from or where not to. Where to end, and where not to.

From where and when does a generation even start and end?”

This is a letter to young passionate Ghanaians like myself. I am hesitant to do this but if I may, by extension, this goes out to young impassioned Africans as well …

Let me attempt to say what needs to be said plain and simple. Nobody has faith in us more than we ourselves. Nobody believes that we can be the change we want to see in our countries. I tell you. They say it is youthful exuberance. That we are no different from them when they were growing up. That we are green-horns. That we don’t understand the system… Or that there is no system. And that the system (or absence of…

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